Catching Up

ICYMI: Apple's New iPhones May Cost A Fortune But Cheaper Fuel Might Help You Afford Them

  • VP Hot Takes is our new weekly roundup of tech and digital lifestyle news in Malaysia.
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Apple Announces New iPhone Line-Up.

On Thursday, Apple revealed the latest in their annual iPhone line-up, with three new notched display models taking over last year’s editions. Each of these new phones are targeted at different price points, with the cheapest among the three being the iPhone XR starting at USD749, followed by the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max starting at USD999 and USD1,099 respectively.

Compared to previous generations, the new phones come with Apple’s new A12 chipsets, dual-SIM capabilities, and significantly larger display options, but also does away completely with fingerprint recognition, the home button, and the free headphone adapter.

As of yet, it’s currently unknown just how much these new phones will cost in Malaysia, but if the past is anything to go on, we can safely expect pricing to start in the mid-RM3k range for the lowest-priced XR model.

Iylia Aziz
Of course Apple turns this into a size competition. “The bigger, the better”? Just f*cking bring Jobs back from the dead and also, stop charging for things that should come with the bloody phone.
Dale John Wong
Apple seems to keep taking away features without slashing prices, but I feel as though it’ll eventually catch up with them. Apple can only survive on reputation for so long. They better innovate or else.
Justin Lee
Looking at how Apple are introducing more phones at much higher prices, more users will switch to Android in the future as not everyone can afford to sell their kidneys for it. Welcome to Android!
Nicholas Ker
Apple does it again: no bundled earphone adaptor, no fingerprint recognition, no home button, and more astronomic prices. Oh, and not forgetting the ground-breaking new feature: The Dual Sim.
Topics Of The Week

Image Credit: Hypebeast

Jack Ma Steps Down As Alibaba President

This week, China’s richest man Jack Ma announced his decision to step down as chairman of Chinese technology giant Alibaba in September 2019 to focus on philanthropic activities. CEO Daniel Zhang is poised to take over as his successor.

Formerly an English teacher, Jack Ma’s decision comes after 11 years of helming a company that has become one of the world’s largest conglomerates valued at USD420 billion with a presence in tech industries such as e-commerce, AI, and cloud services.

Iylia Aziz
It’ll be interesting to see how Alibaba will do under this new management. Gotta give props to the old timer, he’s done a shit ton for not just China’s economy but for all entrepreneurs out there.
Dale John Wong
Jack Ma is arguably the most prominent Chinese of the last half decade, so it’s interesting to see how others will follow in the trail he’s blazed. Chinese entrepreneurship is in an exciting place thanks to him.

Image Credit: Hype MY

Fuel Subsidies To Work Differently In 2019

Malaysia will see a new fuel subsidy system in place next year that will not require large financial allocation from the government. This news was confirmed by Deputy Finance Minister Datuk Amiruddin Hamzah, who also said the new system will remove blanket coverage subsidies in favour of targeted monthly assistance for qualified recipients.

“The government will provide an appropriate monthly petrol subsidy and using a set quota for qualified recipients for use with motorcycles with engines smaller than 125cc and cars below 1,300cc,” he said. “The detailed mechanism for the implementation is still being studied and will be announced once finalised.”

Justin Lee
It’s a good step forward as this will help people who really need it rather than people who drive BMW’s and get to enjoy the subsidies too. As I also drive a 1,300cc car, I’m looking forward to it.
Nicholas Ker
If the subsidy system is implemented well, this could be a decent step in the right direction, but that’s a big “if”. I do feel that there should be incentives to drive smaller-sized engines so, that’s a good thing.

Feature Image Credit: phoneArena.com

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