Lifestyle

Rotimatic automatizes roti making and revolutionizes Indian gender roles

Good news for all Indian ladies: roti making has just been automized!

Known as the first automatic roti making appliance that produces fresh, healthy and homemade rotis without the hassle, Singaporean company, Zimplistic, is boasting to invent something which step changes Indian lives after the invention of the washing machine and cell phone, just to list a couple. Yet I see a greater agenda – Rotimatic aims to eradicate gender prejudices in the Indian culture. Read on to find out why.

Truly impressive, isn’t it? As mentioned above, I see a greater agenda from Rotimatic, and that is to eradicate gender prejudices in the Indian culture. Here’s why:

1. Rotimatic is empowering men to make rotis too

If you do not think that Rotimatic is fighting the gender war, here are some top comments appearing on their Facebook page.

rotimatic top commentsFacebook comments on Rotimatic’s launch video

Whether wives should buy Rotimatic for their husbands, or husbands for their wives, Rotimatic is truly a worthy invention that is extremely simple to use. One simply has to load the appliance, adjust the settings to the levels of thickness and softness that he/she prefers, and fresh rotis are made at the rate of one per minute. It’s really that simple! Indian men (and women who used to feel embarrassed for not knowing how to make rotis) can now make tasty and healthy rotis for the whole family.

2. Rotimatic gives women more time to do other things

So yes, because men can now make rotis with the simple click of a few buttons, women can enjoy more free time to do the things they like. And we know that Rotimatic is only the beginning of what is to come – more automation for cooking and all sorts of household chores, typically assigned to women in the Indian culture.

3. Rotimatic changes the perception that women have to stay at home

With the above, and coupled with the increasing literacy rate of Indian women, I see a new empowerment of Indian women, beyond merely engaging the men in household chores. Estimating that roti takes approximately 2 hours to make, a single woman would be able to save $1.94 per week (from infographic below), which translates to $100.73 per year, and this in turn translates to a startling $61,889,100,000 per year for the entire female Indian population in 2013.

I really love how technology is creating a greater social good. Do you?

Read also: Here’s how social networks look like in food, and they look yummy!

 

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